Credit: Marketingland

 

For more than a year now, many people and some so-called experts are reporting that Facebook is ‘dead’.

They say things like:

‘Many people are leaving Facebook’

‘Facebook is struggling to attract new users’

‘Old people are on Facebook’

‘Facebook is dead’

Well, a bug on Facebook a few days ago reportedly marked many people dead. (maybe the same people who kept saying Facebook is dead).

Only that the bug also caught Mark Zuckerberg’s profile

zuck

Aside the apparent bug, I know for certain that the Facebook is not dead but alive, thriving and arguably the best social media platform to support business growth.

I have written about this before and after running and reviewing campaign strategy for brands like British Council, Siemens, Mlotto and Nestle, as Head of Sales & Marketing at Ringier Digital Marketing, Facebook is definitely not dead. A recent post by Jon Acuff explains it very well with something he shared on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Here’s what he wrote:

Sometimes, people tell me Facebook is dead.

They say, “Millennials don’t use it anymore. It’s not growing like it used to be. It’s mostly for your aunt.”

Articles from experts have said this for years.

I can’t tell you how many new platforms have been labeled “The Facebook Killer.” This isn’t unusual. For years, NBA experts called people “The next Jordan.” Harold Miner, who played for USC, was even labeled “Baby Jordan.”

If you’re building a business, writing books, trying to be a photographer or doing any sort of freelance work, it’s important to put your best effort into the best social media platforms.

So, is Facebook dead?

Let’s look at some data real quick.

On October 13th, I posted a photo about Ken Bone, the mustachioed man in the red sweater from the debate. Here’s how it performed on Twitter:

twitter

I got 36 retweets and 71 likes. That’s not bad and maybe to be expected considering I didn’t actually post the photo into Twitter. Let’s imagine if I had, the results would have been five times larger. So, around 200 retweets and 350 likes is what we could expect.

How about on Instagram?

In addition to likes, there are three other things that Instagram measures:
1. Impressions
2. Reach
3. Engagement

Impressions = The total number of times your post has been seen.
Reach = Number of unique accounts who saw your post.
Engagement = Number of unique accounts who liked or commented.

On Instagram, my photo of Ken Bone was seen 48,600 times. Almost 34,000 unique accounts saw it. And there were 3,671 points of engagement.

instagram

That’s awesome! Remember, 36 people retweeted it. On Instagram, 3,671 people interacted with it. That’s a 100x difference.

Last, but not least, let’s look at Facebook.

It’s dead. It’s for grandmas and people who love cats, which is probably redundant.

How did the exact same thing do on Facebook? I didn’t change anything. In fact, when I posted it on Instagram it just automatically went to Facebook too.

facebook

On Facebook, it was shared 7,384 times. It was liked 18,000 times. And most importantly, it had a reach of 2,899,540 people. Let me repeat that. On Facebook, the post reached 2.8 million people.

If you’re an entrepreneur, ignore Facebook at your peril.

Are there cooler platforms? Are there sexier technologies? Are there higher tech ways to grow your business?

Sure, but 36 people shared my tweet on Twitter. Around 50,000 people saw it on Instagram. And it reached 2.8 million on Facebook.

So if you have not been exploring Facebook platform, start today!

Share your experiences of the platform in the comment below

ibukun

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